Former law enforcement officers and company founders - on protecting your identity



Texas Ranger
Texas Ranger: Co-Founder Terry Welch



Police
Police: Co-Founder Kim Sanders

2013 Recap on Cyberattacks on US Companies

 According to Ellen Nakashiuma at the Washington Post, federal agents notified more than 3,000 U.S. companies last year that their computer systems had been hacked, White House officials have told industry executives, marking the first time the government has revealed how often it tipped off the private sector to cyber intrusions. The alerts went to firms large and small, from local banks to major defense contractors to national retailers such as Target, which suffered a breach last fall that led to the theft of tens of millions of Americans’ credit card and personal data, according to government and industry officials. Three thousand companies is astounding,” said James A. Lewis, a senior fellow and cyberpolicy expert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. “The problem is as big or bigger than we thought.” The number reflects only a fraction of the true scale of cyber intrusions into the private sector by criminal groups and foreign governments and their proxies, particularly in China and Eastern Europe. The estimated cost to U.S. companies and consumers is up to $100 billion annually, analysts say.

 The scale of notifications is an effort to ramp up the sharing of threat information by the FBI, the Department of Homeland Security and other agencies with U.S. companies, officials say. The alerts follow a February 2013 executive order by President Obama to “increase in volume, timeliness, and quality” the cyber-threat information shared with the private sector so people can better defend themselves. The disclosure comes as the federal government has struggled to pass legislation to set security standards that companies in critical sectors must follow and to increase information-sharing between the public and private sectors. It also comes amid reports that the National Security Agency has breached the servers of a Chinese telecommunications firm to learn whether the company has been spying on behalf of Beijing, although agency officials say the United States does not steal corporate data to benefit U.S. companies’ competitiveness.

 In the absence of cyber-security legislation, the government last month unveiled a voluntary framework of best practices that companies can follow to secure their computer networks. Lisa Monaco, deputy national security adviser for homeland security and counterterrorism, told industry leaders at a White House event that the government had alerted more than 3,000 companies, officials said. “When companies are notified that they have been victimized by malicious cyber actors, it should be a wake-up call,” White House cyber-security coordinator Michael Daniel said in a statement to The Washington Post. “U.S. businesses must improve their cyber-security.” Daniel said that companies need to make “smart investments” in personnel and technology, and that staying on top of threats through information-sharing with government agencies is crucial. “These notifications are helping to build and exercise public-private teamwork on a daily basis,” he said.

 About 2,000 of the notifications were made in person or by phone by the FBI, which has 1,000 people dedicated to cyber-security investigations among 56 field offices and its headquarters. Some of the notifications were made to the same company for separate intrusions, officials said. Although in-person visits are preferred, resource constraints limit the bureau’s ability to do them all that way, former officials said. Nonetheless, agents are trying to provide companies with useful information that can help them identify the problem and stop the bleeding of data, said special agent Tim Marsh of the FBI’s cyber division. “One of the frustrating parts for our industry was agents going out and saying, ‘You’re a victim, you’re being targeted, and I can’t tell you anything else.’ So we spend a lot of time making sure that before we send an agent or an investigator out that they have quality information to provide to the company,” he said. That could include Internet protocol addresses, malware samples and specific attack signatures, industry officials said.

 Officials with the Secret Service, an agency of the Department of Homeland Security that investigates financially motivated cyber-crimes, said that they notified companies in 590 criminal cases opened last year, officials said. Some cases involved more than one company. The list included Target, which the agency said it alerted in December. Others notified by the Secret Service last year included a major U.S. media organization, a large U.S. bank, a major software provider, and numerous small and medium-size retailers, restaurants and hotels, officials said. “Within hours of us coming up with information that we can provide, we would go to a victim,’’ said Edward Lowery, Secret Service special agent in charge of the criminal investigative division. “The reaction would be just like when you’re told you’re the victim of any crime. There’s disbelief, there’s anger, all those stages, because there’s a lot at stake here.” To better coordinate the alert process, the FBI is expanding a computer system used to track counterterrorism tips and information, called Guardian, to include cyber-security cases across the government. The idea is to avoid duplication of efforts between agencies and make sure, for instance, that the FBI knows when the Secret Service is notifying a company. In most cases, the company had no idea it had been breached, officials say. According to Verizon, which compiles an annual data-breach survey, in seven out of 10 cases, companies learn from an external party — usually a government agency — that they’ve been victimized.

 That’s an ironic role reversal, said Steven Chabinsky, former deputy assistant director of the FBI cyber division. “It’s usually the victim calling 911, not 911 calling the victim,” he said. A company in the Midwest that was notified Wednesday by the FBI welcomed the tip-off, according to an industry official familiar with the case. Company officials were given a spot clearance for a few hours so the agent could brief them on classified threat information, the official said. In some cases that involve companies with sophisticated capabilities, the government is not telling them what they don’t already know, industry officials said. “What they find is that they’re giving up more information to the government than the government’s giving them that’s of value,” said a cybersecurity consultant who spoke on the condition of anonymity to be candid.

 Many of the companies the FBI has notified in past years were defense contractors, said Chabinsky, who stepped down in September 2012. And often it is China that is behind such intrusions, experts say. More than two dozen major weapons systems have been breached by Chinese hackers, who experts say focus on advanced technologies in bio-technology, space and alternative energy. The FBI often discovers that companies have been hacked by surveilling a virtual stash-house or “hop point” server used by hackers to store data that has been siphoned off from a firm. The hackers use that server to store stolen material from numerous victims, officials said. One hop point could have more than 100 victims. Often, the FBI makes repeat notifications. “We used to have one agent who, when approaching a company, would say, ‘Unfortunately, this is going to be the beginning of a long-term relationship,’ ” said Chabinsky, who was the FBI’s top cyber lawyer and is now general counsel and chief risk officer for CrowdStrike, a cybersecurity firm. The reason, he said, is that the victim is usually being targeted by an unrelenting foreign power such as China or Russia. Lewis said that when it comes to theft of intellectual property, those two countries account for the bulk of all cases. “Far and away the largest is China,” he said. “The second-largest is Russia. Between those two, you’re probably looking at more than two-thirds of cases in the United States.”

Target’s (plus other large retailers’) Breach – Over 40 Million Credit and Debit Cards Compromised

As you have heard by now, this holiday season, hackers stole over 40 million credit and debit card numbers from Target’s retail system. This makes all of us extra cautious about protecting our own computer systems. Here’s how to hold off those hackers:

1. “ABC” online. ”Always Be Careful” when checking emails and surfing the Web. Hackers use these online connections to get malware onto your system that gives them access to personal information and passwords.
  • Watch for bad links: Check a link by resting your cursor on it, without clicking, to see the web address. If you want “Sports.com” but you see “x83pzt.net,” don’t click on it.
  • Avoid questionable websites: Places that push the norms of taste and morality are notorious sources of malware.
  • Don’t fall for phishing scams: Wiring money to someone you don’t know is never a good idea. But also watch for scams that pose as your bank, email provider, social media, or even the IRS. Banks don’t ask to reset your password by email and the IRS never emails taxpayers.
  • Don’t download from an unknown source: Only get files or apps from websites you trust.
2. Use different passwords for different sites and accounts. That way, if one account is hacked, only one is compromised. Write passwords down and keep in a secure place, or use a secure online password manager.
3. Make passwords hard to hack and change them often. ”Password” and “123456″ are easy to hack. So is your birthdate and your child’s name, which can be found online. Experts suggest using a long sentence with numbers and symbols, such as “PumpkinsClimbIntoHurricanes%82&.” Or make up an even longer sentence, such as “I came to Dallas in 2011 after living in Atlanta for 4 years”, but just use the first letter of each word: “IctDi2011aliAf4y.” And change passwords every six months.
4. Watch what gets stored. Never email or text your Social Security Number (pictures of your SS Card are much safer). Delete old messages with bank account info or credit card numbers. Never put your master list of passwords on your computer.
5. Use protection tools: 
  • Antivirus software: Scans for known computer viruses and some can detect phishing scams and other schemes.
  • Secure connections: If a website uses your personal info, make sure you’re on a secure, encrypted connection. Instead of “http,” the web page URL should start with “https”–the “s” stands for “secure.”
  • Two-factor authentication: This makes sure no one can pose as you. Once you set it up, every login needs two steps. First, enter user name and password. Then you’ll get a third, one-time password sent to your phone or other device. This option is offered by Amazon, Facebook, Google, Twitter, and others.
What to do if you’ve been hacked. Take these steps immediately:
  • 1) Destroy the computer virus: Run antivirus software to find and remove the virus.
  • 2) Update all software: Download the latest versions of all programs, including operating system, Internet browsers (Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari, etc.), Office, and Adobe programs.
  • 3) Change all passwords: Make sure to do this on a different computer from the one that got infected. If the virus had keylogging software, hackers might find the new passwords.
Provided by First Choice Bank and keepmyID.org

The Obamacare Update

     While it is not ID theft, we often get questions surrounding Medical ID Theft that lead to questions about “Obamacare.”  Here is the latest update reported to us: It was recently reported that the Obama administration has ordered more changes to the Affordable Care Act (formerly known as Obamacare).
  • First, employers with between 50 and 99 employees get another year before their employer mandate takes effect, as these companies now have until 2016 to provide insurance coverage to workers.
  • Second, the requirement for employers with 100 or more workers to have 95 percent of full-time workers covered drops to 70 percent for now, before rising to 95 percent in 2016. Both moves seem to suggest that the administration recognizes how difficult implementation of the law will be for employers of every size. Industry lobbyists have been pushing for delays in implementing the new rules, arguing that too many questions still exist for the rules to be applied equally in all industries.
     Susan Nash, a partner at McDermott Will & Emery LLP, advises clients on how to comply with the new health care law. She said, “if they have to live with this requirement, then more employer-friendly rules are obviously welcome. This gives employers more breathing room to get the hours-counting under control.” She added that the difficult part of complying with the law, for many companies, is determining who is considered a full-time employee. It is not always easy to determine how many hours an employee works in an average week, especially for businesses that hire seasonal workers, or businesses like health care or teaching that have complicated ways to measure actual hours worked. The National Restaurant Association said in a statement that the flexibility would benefit employers with workers whose hours are not set.
     Politically, the move has led to more criticism of President Obama by Republicans, who claim his unilateral changes to the law are wrong or even unconstitutional. House Speaker John Boehner said “And, once again, the president is rewriting law on a whim. If the administration doesn’t believe employers can manage the burden of the law, how can struggling families be expected to?” The administration counters that the U.S. Treasury Secretary has broad authority under the tax code to implement laws like Obamacare in ways that will encourage compliance, including by phasing-in requirements.
From Bryan Ellis and keepmyID
Information from:

Property Records are Free

Scammers are attempting to charge new homeowners for unnecessary property records that are available for free (or a few bucks) at county government offices.  The Milwaukee Sentinel Journal reported this week that fake companies are sending customers formal letters resembling government bills that charge relatively low sums for “real property records” or “document fees” related to their recent closing.  If the new homeowners read the fine print at the bottom of the page, they will see that the companies sending the bills “are not affiliated with the State of WI or the County Recorder” and the bill “[should] not be…interpreted as a bill due.” However, most homeowners are simply sending in the money without even asking questions, said one Wisconsin records clerk, who added, “They’re just excited they get their house.”
This scam is not exclusive to Milwaukee.
These types of letters are being sent out nationwide.
Do not fall for it.
It is a scam.
Tip for the day!
From Bryan Ellis and keepmyID

Best Identity Theft Protection

This may come to you as a surprise but somebody out there could be using your identity and enjoying all the luxuries of life at your expense! Shocked? If yes, then before this happens to you for real, here ares some of the best ways to prevent identity theft:

Best Identity Theft Protection

Statistics show that approximately 12.6 million Americans became victims of ID theft crime in 2012. This figure is expected to go higher in 2013 and in the years to come. To avoid becoming a number, here’s what you can do:

First Things First- Safeguard Your Social Security Number

Did you know more than 50% of these crimes are because the criminals manage to get access to the victim’s social security number? Therefore safeguard your social security number and don’t let it get in the wrong hands. You can do this by keeping your SSN card in a secure place (like a locked safe deposit box at home, or better yet, at your bank). Avoid carrying it in your wallet. In case you lose your wallet or get robbed, the criminal will not be able to get his/her hands on your SSN card.

Another way to stay protected is always get a different number for your all your benefit plans like health insurance and benefit card instead of getting all the cards issued on your social security number. This is one of the effective ways to prevent identity theft because even if the criminal gets access to your SSN card, the criminal can’t do much with it.

Avoid Phishing Emails

A study by Javelin Strategy & Research shows that in 2012, 38 percent of ID crime was through phishing emails. Phishing emails are emails where the criminal disguises himself as a legitimate service provider (like a bank or a credit card company) and tricks the victim into providing his/her personal and confidential details.Those who are unaware of this id theft strategy usually end up as its victims. This is because these emails are written in a formal style and are so convincing that it is extremely hard to identify whether the email is fake or real.

However, to stay safe, avoid replying to such emails. In addition, contact the company on its official number to ensure if they actually did send you a mail or not.

Hire an Identity Theft Protection Service

To protect yourself from identity theft, hire a reliable and a professional identity theft protection company. These companies take every possible measure to keep you safe from this crime…unlike credit monitoring companies, who just inform you after you become a victim.

How to Protect Yourself from Tax Refund Fraud

Have you paid more taxes than your tax liability? Are you thinking of filing for a tax refund from IRS? Are you looking for a tax preparer that can help you with this ordeal? If yes, then stop! Before you hire a tax preparer for this task, you must first read this article and learn why you should be cautious when you file a refund.

Tax Fraud – the Nation’s Fastest Growing ID Crime

Did you know tax refund theft is the fastest growing ID crime in the US today? According to a report published by Consumer Sentinel Network (CSN), this crime is growing massively. For those who are not aware, this involves the criminal stealing the victim’s Social Security Number to secure a tax refund. If the criminal files a refund before you, then your refund not only gets delayed for six months but you are also forced to spend endless hours with tax authorities convincing them that you didn’t file for the first refund under your name.

How to Protect Yourself from ID Tax Refund Fraud

As compared to 2012, this crime has increased by 43% this year and approximately $5.2 billion stolen in the name of tax refunds so far in 2013. Although the Criminal Investigation (CI), a major component ofIRS (Internal Revenue Service) is making all possible efforts to stop this crime from increasing any further their efforts will be in vain if you don’t play your part.

To stop identity theft, here’s what you can do:

1. Avoid providing your personal and confidential information including your SSN number via email. Many ID scammers use the phishing email technique to steal your Identity and then they use it to file a refund. If you receive an email that appears to be from the IRS, it’s probably a scam. Here’s why! The IRS does not contact taxpayers through email or texts or even social media pages to acquire any confidential information.

2. To avoid tax fraud make sure the tax preparer you choose has an IRS preparer Tax IdentificationNumber (PTIN). If your tax preparer does not write this number on your tax return, this means you are most probably working with a shady tax preparer.

3. Never provide your SSN or any piece of confidential or financial information to telemarketers because it can be misused easily to file tax returns.

4. Another way to protect yourself from ID theft and probably the best one is to hire a professional and a reliable identity theft protection company. Unlike credit monitoring services (which only inform you after you become a victim), an ID theft prevention service takes all safety measures to ensure you don’t fall prey in the first place.

Advtanges of Hiring an ID Theft Protection Service

If you are living in the US without any identity theft protection, and you haven’t become a victim of id theft as yet, then thank your lucky stars! Did you know according to the US Department of Justice and Javelin Strategy & Research, the average number of identity fraud victims is approximately 11,571,900 per year? So far the total financial loss attributed to id theft for this year is about $21 billion which is 7.8 billion more than the financial loss reported in the year 2010.

Types of Cases Reported

The types of identity fraud cases reported were largely:

1. Stolen credit card numbers (64.1 percent)

2. Misuse of bank account numbers (35 percent)

3. Misuse of Private and Personal Information (14.2 percent)

To ensure you don’t fall prey to such nefarious practices yourself, you must hire a reliable and a trusted professional identity theft service provider.

Why Hire an Id Protection Service Company?

Many US citizens believe that a credit monitoring service will protect them from becoming an id theft victim. This is a misconception! A credit monitoring service informs you when you become a victim, which just isn’t good enough! To ensure your ID remains safe and protected from stealthy criminals, you need to enroll in an ID theft protection service. Unlike a credit monitoring service, ID theft protection services take all possible measures to keep ID criminals at bay. They don’t just inform you beforehand. They take every effective measure to protect your identity from getting into the wrong hands.

Advantages of Hiring an Id-theft Protection Service

There are many tips to prevent identity theft. With our busy work schedules and hectic routines, it’s not always possible to check all three credit reports by Experian, Equifax and TransUnion on a daily basis, call credit companies to make sure the mails sent by them are not phishing emails, plus other things that eat up your time. Therefore, the best way to keep yourself safe from such frauds is to hire an ID theft protection company. The following are just some of the benefits of working with them:

  • Continuous Fraud Alerts: They place fraud alerts on all your credit profiles after every 90 days/3 months. This helps monitor any suspicious activity related to your account. According to FBI statistics this practice reduces chances of ID fraud by 80 percent.
  • Junk Mail and Telemarketer Reduction Program: These companies have special junk mail and telemarketer reduction programs that keep your inbox from getting flooded with junk mail, which more often than not contain phishing emails sent by scammers trying to trick people into disclosing their confidential information. Telemarketer reduction programs are designed to protect you from receiving telemarketing calls which many ID criminals use to acquire their victims’ private information.
  • Insurance Coverage: If for some reason your identity gets stolen, some ID protection companies also provide an insurance coverage to cushion you from the loss that you may incur.

So, don’t put your identity at risk. Hire an identity-theft protection service today!

How to Protect Yourself from Tax Refund Fraud

Have you paid more taxes than your tax liability? Are you thinking of filing for a tax refund from IRS? Are you looking for a tax preparer that can help you with this ordeal? If yes, then stop! Before you hire a tax preparer for this task, you must first read this article and learn why you should be cautious when you file a refund.

Tax Fraud – the Nation’s Fastest Growing ID Crime

Did you know tax refund theft is the fastest growing ID crime in the US today? According to a report published by Consumer Sentinel Network (CSN), this crime is growing massively. For those who are not aware, this involves the criminal stealing the victim’s Social Security Number to secure a tax refund.

If the criminal files a refund before you, then your refund not only gets delayed for six months but you are also forced to spend endless hours with tax authorities convincing them that you didn’t file for the first refund under your name.

How to Protect Yourself from ID Tax Refund Fraud?

As compared to 2012, this crime has increased by 43% this year and approximately $5.2 billion stolen in the name of tax refunds so far in 2013. Although the Criminal Investigation (CI), a major component of IRS (Internal Revenue Service) is making all possible efforts to stop this crime from increasing any further their efforts will be in vain if you don’t play your part.

To stop identity theft, here’s what you can do:

  1. Avoid providing your personal and confidential information including your SSN number via email. Many id scammers use the phishing email technique to steal your Identity and then they use it to file a refund. If you receive an email that appears to be from the IRS, it’s probably a scam. Here’s why! The IRS does not contact taxpayers through email or texts or even social media pages to acquire any confidential information.
  2. To avoid tax fraud make sure the tax preparer you choose has an IRS preparer Tax Identification Number (PTIN). If your tax preparer does not write this number on your tax return, this means you are most probably working with a shady tax preparer.
  3. Never provide your SSN or any piece of confidential or financial information to telemarketers because it can be misused easily to file tax returns.
  4.  Another way to protect yourself from ID theft and probably the best one is to hire a professional and a reliable identity theft protection company. Unlike credit monitoring services it does not inform you after you become a victim instead it takes all safety measures to ensure you don’t fall prey in the first place.

Family Fraud up by 47%

Family fraud is almost unimaginable. How can you even think of a family member — like your mom or your dad or your child — stealing your identity?  Well, the truth of the matter is this crime is growing rapidly in the U.S.

According to a study conducted by ID Analytics in 2011 about 500,000 children under 18 years of age had their ID stolen by their parents. The study also showed that approximately 2 million elderly parents were victimized by their adult children. Compared to the last three years, this crime is up by 47%.

Family Fraud

Family fraud occurs when a family member or close friend steals your identity and misuses it in his/her own personal interest. There are three main reasons why this crime is on the rise:

  1. The targeted identity is much easier to steal (easy access);
  2. The thief knows a lot of information about the person so it is easier to accomplish; and
  3. Thieves believe they are insulated from prosecution – as family members are rarely cooperative with police.

An example of this is parents who need large loans.  Their credit is wrecked so they wind up stealing their 18 year old’s identity to amass funds for it.  Yes, this is a real life example unfortunately.  When stated income loans were commonly accepted, this was even more popular.  For the parents it seems to be a good way to help the family.  Their children remain clueless until they apply for a student credit card in college and their application gets rejected because of the theft.  Then they are left with a financial, social, and moral problem.

However, when it comes to family fraud, children are not the only victims. Many senior citizens around the ages of 60 to 80 are also victimized by their adult children. Since the elderly are often vulnerable and dependent on their children, it becomes easier for the latter to access their personal information and steal their identities.

Protecting your Identity

After looking at the family fraud statistics, you may feel worried — even among your family members. This is unfortunate but it’s a fact. You can either deny it or focus on ways to prevent it from happening to you.

What Do I Do??

Many people take on credit monitoring services for ID protection but unfortunately such services only inform you about the crime once it has been committed.  They do nothing to put blocks in place to prevent this.  They also commonly “assist you” in cleaning up the mess but they do not do it for you.  The average victim spends 331 hours trying to clean up the mess left behind.  Do you have 331 hours to spend on this?  No.  Of course not.  So do you want to hire a service that does all the work for you and doesn’t show you how?  No thanks! In addition, almost all the companies out there only protect you from financial ID theft.  That sector represents 51% of ID theft.  There is also:

  • Medical ID Theft
  • Child and Elderly ID Theft
  • Tax Fraud (filing fake tax returns, etc.)
  • Benefits Fraud
  • Criminal ID Theft (getting arrested in your name)
  • Employment Fraud (a felon or an illegal getting a job in your name)
  • Social Security Fraud (yes, they will start to collect your benefits)
  • Family Fraud

What is your monitoring service going to do about most of these?  I can tell you — nothing.  Make sure you get a service that (1) prevents (not monitors) identity theft and (2) covers ALL ID theft events; not just half of them.  Maybe you are not sure what they provide (understandably, as many companies blur the lines).  Many provide little to no protection.  Put them to the test:  Ask them these four questions:

(1)  Do you hire an attorney for me from Day One?  In order to ensure preventative services are provided (fraud alerts, credit freezes, extended fraud alerts, credit reports, etc.) they must hire an attorney for you, to act as your personal representative.  That is the law.  Don’t settle for “we’ll show you how to do it.”  No, that is their job.   If they say NO, move on.  They are really just a monitoring service pretending to be a prevention service.  Again, be wary of any company touting monitoring as their primary service.

(2)  Do you ensure that fraud alerts are put on my accounts every 90 days?  This is ID Theft 101.  Alerts are your main tool for blocking financial ID theft.  If they say NO, move on quickly.

(3)  Do you protect me from ALL ID theft events (Medical, Tax, [see above])?  If they do not, red flag, move on.

(4)    Do you offer unlimited recovery services and assign a case worker to do ALL the work for me, if I ever get my identity stolen?  The FBI reports that you will spend 331 hours trying to clean up the mess that ID theft leaves behind.  You do not have time for that.  That is their job.  If they do not assign a case worker who does ALL (not part) of the work for you, move on.

You need a service that not just monitors and informs but also prevents the crime from happening in the first place. This calls for registering with a reliable and a trusted identity theft protection company.  Do your research and get the most for your money.  As with most things in life, you get what you pay for.

Provided by keepmyID.org

Medical Identity Theft a Growing Concern

The increasing wave of identity theft suggests it will not be over anytime soon. In fact over the years it has increased tremendously — with more than 12.6 million Americans becoming victims of this crime in 2012.  This figure includes cases of medical identity theft as well.

According to Ponemon Institute’s annual study, the cost of medical identity theft totaled $41 billion in 2012.  This crime has become a growing concern in the US health care industry.

What is Medical Identity Theft?

This theft occurs when somebody steals your personal information such as your Social Security Number, name, or Medicare number and takes advantage of your medical insurance. It can be extremely damaging and dangerous as it puts medical facts in your medical file that are not true.

Michael Weatherford Case

This is a recent medical ID theft case that happened in Ohio.  The victim was Michael Weatherford.  The criminal misused Weatherford’s medical information for over five years and finally got arrested. Weatherford had no idea it had happened.  All he knew was a man robbed him in Illinois six years ago and took his driver’s license.

The criminal, Kenneth Marshall, used the stolen driver’s license to obtain medical treatment by identifying himself as Weatherford. He stole his identity and took advantage of medical care in the mount of $345,000 at Ohio State Wexner Medical Center before detection.

It begs the question…what steps have you taken to protect your identity?

Say Goodbye to MONITORING Services, say Hello to ID Theft PREVENTION

If you are relying on monitoring services then it’s time you changed services.  The reason: monitoring companies don’t provide you protection against ID theft.  They only inform you AFTER the crime has taken place and your ID is already stolen.  By the time you know about it, the criminal has already inflicted the damage.

The best way to prevent medical-related or any other ID theft is to sign up with a trusted ID theft PREVENTION (not monitoring) company. These companies take preventative measures to protect your identity. Make sure they hire an attorney for you first.  That is step one.  If they do not, don’t sign up.  Make sure they place the fraud alerts for you and protect you from ALL ID theft; not just some forms.  Take action now to protect yourself from being victimized!

Identity Theft in the news...

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